Celebrations

October 22, 2013

1. I actually blogged about a book I used this past week as a reflection. I am feeling the nudge because I have been writing personal stories and insights. Putting writing into practice is good and it’s taking away the fear of that blank page.

2. My cat, Kip, and dog, Harley, a learning to coexist in our home. With the colder weather, Kip has wanted in. He has been kind of the house for ten years and does not appreciate the anxious lets-get-to-know-you teenage dog. Their interactions have brought laughter to our house and comfort too. Both like to cuddle up, a delight each time.

3. I have been writing in my Harley journal each morning. Sometimes it is a quote from a book I am reading or just an antic I noticed from Harley. This past weekend, I began writing longer just because I needed to. I felt like I needed to connect some story or analogy I observed from Harley, so I wrote. As I wrote, I had a huge epiphany from God that I just kept writing. The moment was caught because I was writing.

4. On Tuesday, to my surprise and delight, a kindergartener leaned his head against me at the car pick-up line. His voluntary movement caught me off guard. I slightly pulled away, not recognizing what he was doing, to which he responded by doing it again, this time with arms wrapping me in a hug. “I like you, Mrs. Gensch,” he said with a smile. Ooooh, I hugged him right back. I love touching the hearts of children ’cause they touch mine.

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The Junkyard Wonders

April 14, 2011

Patricia Polacco is one of my favorite authors. Her writing is warm, full of meaning, with hints of humor. The Junkyard Wonders is a memoir about her school days. Her book is a tribute to the inspiring teacher in all of us.

Mrs. Peterson began her school year with a note of expectation that all her students would acquire.  With a dictionary in her hand, she read the definition of genius to the class of special children.

Genius is neither learned nor acquired.

It is risking without fear of failure.

It is creativity without constraints.

It is … extraordinary intelligence!”

Your heart will sail as she tells her students to memorize it, to look at it every day. “The definition describes every one of you.”

Patricia was placed in a special class. The class had been dubbed “The Junkyard.” Mrs. Peterson believed in her students’ potentials despite their challenges. For learning, she placed the class into tribes. The tribes worked on projects together throughout the year. The five kids in Patricia’s group became very close.

Due to bullying and wanting her kids to see themselves as more than just the left-overs, Mrs. Peterson took the children to the junkyard. They were to create a new invention from the junk they collected. Patricia’s group created a plane that could fly. They decided to launch it at the science fair.

One boy, Jody, had a disease that caused his body to grow too fast. That spring, Jody’s heart gave out and he died. (Yes, I cried. Patricia knows how to pull at my heart-strings.) The plane was a tribute for Jody. The closeness, hard work, and genius propelled their plane into the sky.

I love the ending. Patricia Polacco has an epilogue about her tribe. The other three children grew and flourished into amazing positions – ballet school director, world renown fashion designer, NASA engineer, and Patricia became a phenomenal children’s author.  They attributed their success to their teacher, Mrs. Peterson.

Savorings for reading and in writing for The Junkyard Wonders:

  • Believing in yourself – overcoming hardship
  • Community – accepting and seeing possibility in everyone
  • Transitions – highlighting main events throughout the year
  • Character description
  • Strong emotional sense

A Lost Colonial Colony?

November 21, 2009

Roanoke: The Lost Colony--An Unsolved Mystery from HistoryI’m amazed by the Roanoke Colony Mystery.  I must have been sleeping during history class, because I’ve learned of Roanoke in recent years.  Jane Yolen writes eloquently.  She collaborates with her daughter, Heidi, in creating a children’s book on the known history surrounding the Roanoke Colony.  The five most popular theories are shared in the conclusion.  The book is called Roanoke The Lost Colony:  An Unsolved Mystery From History.

The authors begin the book iwth a young girl, who wants to be a detective.  She collects the information in her notebook.  The story of Roanoke is shared in a narrative nonfiction format.  Factual clues are written on a notebook inlaid in the illustration.  vocabulary words are sprinkled on the text’s off sides.  History comes alive.

Savorings for reading and in writing for Roanoke the Lost Colony:

  • Background knowledge – formation of our country; Native Americans and early colonists
  • Notebooks – collecting information during reading
  • Vocabulary – defined and in the context
  • Synthesize – what happened?  Draw your own conclusions.

(3rd grade book)


A Thanksgiving Comedy

November 18, 2009

Lisa Wheeler has created a fun Thanksgiving comedy in her book, Turk and Runt.  Turk is a grand turkey, “the biggest, strongest, and most graceful bird on Wishbone Farm.”  Turk’s parents have big aspirations for him.  Turk is his mother’s dancer and his father’s football player.  The family does not notice the Thanksgiving clues, except for Runt.  Runt knows that his brother will be chosen for someone’s feast – “But no one ever listened to Runt.”

When Madame Waddelle and Coach giblet come to Wishbone Farm, Turk’s parents believe Turk finally has his big chance.  Turk performs brilliantly and becomes the pick for their dinner.  runt is keen and springs into action, coughing and wheezing uncontrollably.  Turk is saved, as the customers flee.  Still no one realizes that Runt has saved Turk once again.
In the end, when Runt is chosen for someone’s feast, Turk realizes that Runt has been right all along.  He springs into action and saves his little brother.   Enjoy read aloud.
Savorings for reading and in writing for Turk and Runt:
  • Voice – “Look at zee size of zose drumsticks!”
  • Illustrations – character feelings are shown through the turkey characters’ faces
  • Inference
  • Repeating Structure – father praises Turk; mother praises Turk’ runt gives a warning that no one pays attention to
  • Passage of Time
  • Humor – “He’s a goner, ” said his brother, Runt.
  • Surprise Ending – “Over my feathered body!” Runt said.  “We’re not plucked yet.  I have a grade-A-plan!


Giving with Thanks

November 10, 2009

Marlo Thomas edited the book, Thanks & Giving All Year Long.  Several writers and illustrators, TV and movie actors contributed their childhood memories or imaginative stories to crate this collection of writings.  All contributions from the book go to help the researchers and doctors at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Marlo Thomas introduces the book with a quote from her father.

My father used to tell me that there are two kinds of people in the world:  the takers and the givers.  The takers sometimes eat better, he would say, but the givers always sleep better.

Marlo continues to share that we have many reasons to be thankful.  She enjoys the holiday of Thanksgiving with memories from her childhood.  She encourages her readers to be thankful throughout the year.  Her focus is for people to be givers.  A sincere smile is giving.

The children in our classroom need to be givers.  We have a responsibility to build a community of learners in our classroom.  By having the children hear the stories of thankfulness, we can help them to be more aware of the needs of others around them, building the community of learning with it.

Savorings for reading and in writing for Thanks & Giving All Year Long:

  • Short Stories – stories that focus on small moments with important events
  • Variety of Genres – songs, letters, fables, poems, comics, narrative
  • Letter Writing – tow great examples of letters written to a sibling, remembering a special time and building them up
  • Purpose – the author wrote the book with the intention of building others up and raising funds for research
  • Community Building
  • Health – explore St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital website and learn about children that are their age

Review of Autumn

November 6, 2009

I would like to feature some of the autumn topic books from last year.  I have begun to read some to classes and love the theme.  I have some new ones that I will be adding to starting tomorrow.  Enjoy the season.

Fall Books:

Fall is Here:  I Love It by Elaine Good

Peepers by Eve Bunting

Thanksgiving Books:

An Outlaw Thanksgiving by Emily Arnold McCully

Pilgrim Cat by Carol Antoinette Peacock

Sara Morton’s Day:  A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Girl  by Kate Walters

‘Twas the Night Before Thanksgiving by Dav Pilkey

Squanto’s Journey by Joseph Bruchac

The Very First Thanksgiving by Rhonda Gowler Greene

 


Content Areas

September 22, 2009

Today I updated the Content Area page.  I have listed several books  featured in the blog within two categories:  science and social studies.  (Historical Narrative is a genre that I enjoy.)   When you click on the title, the link takes you to the blog page with other teaching possibilities.    Eventually, I hope to write about several math books that are good read alouds as well.  May you  find the update  useful.  :)


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