Fortunately, Unfortunately

Have you ever had one of those days? You know, the day you have planned out and obstacles happen along the way. Welcome to this post. Literally. I have typed this post twice only to have the page come up blank. Frustrating. Fortunately, I write out my reviews and am able to revise my thoughts. 🙂

Michael Foreman must have had a day like this. He created an adventurous, fun book in Fortunately, Unfortunately. Your students will have fun following the adventure, especially the boys.

The day begin ordinarily for Milos, the monkey. He’s returning the umbrella to his grandmother. Along the way, several detours create problems for him.

Michael Foreman teaches children to see a positive in each negative happening. The cause and effect text shares a domino of events, creating anticipation from the reader.

Savorings for reading and in writing for Fortunately, Unfortunately:

  • Perspective
  • Cause and effect
  • Sequence of events
  • Fantasy sprinkled in to an ordinary event – teaches children how to fabricate the everyday events of their lives
  • Prediction – what’s new?

Warsaw Community Public Library – new (c2011)

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4 Responses to Fortunately, Unfortunately

  1. This reminds me of the book that Brian Selznick said inspired him as a child. Fortunately by Remy Charlip. Selznick said he was drawn to the way the action of the book was propelled forward by the turning of the page. This was back when he had just written The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I am interested to see just how similar these books are!

    http://www.amazon.com/Fortunately-Remy-Charlip/dp/0689716605

  2. Linda Baie says:

    The book also sounds like Viorst’s Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. I’d love to use it for a good discussion at most levels in looking for the positive and for writing some fun poetry. Thanks!

  3. Enjoyed reading this blog and you animal blog. I especiallyjoyed the theme in this book with the author teaching kids to look for the good in the negative things that happen daily. Helps them become more observant and less judgmental. I didn’t look but my guess is you are from the Comment Challenge. Nice to meet you. And, thanks for stopping by my blog. Doubt you read my comment to you, but you left out an “s” in your blog name Book Savor(s) when I clicked on it I couldn’t fnd you right away.

  4. MotherReader says:

    I remember the Charlip version too! It was a favorite of mine, so I’ll have to check out this book.

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