Author Tidbits: a Pleasing Bit of Information

July 28, 2011

Author Tidbits is something new I have decided to add to my blog. As I read children’s books, I like to gain some background knowledge about the author to share with the children. Making a connection to the author enriches their writing and boost their confidence.  It’s important to notice how the child is writing like an author and then state it to him/her.

As I have blogged about books, I try to link the author’s websites to the post. I am finding that several authors also have video clips linked on their websites or when I search Google. The interviews I’ve viewed are enriching as a writer, and I want my students to have that opportunity to feel connected. A new tab has been featured on my blog, listing the authors and a short summary of what you can find on their websites. I will also feature an author on my Thursday posts.

Today’s author:  Pamela Duncan Edwards

Pamela Duncan Edwards’s website features a for children tab that has puzzles, creative character building, and a number game as part of its features. Children will have fun exploring her website.  For teachers, Pamela has several lessons linked to her books. She has 9 Smart Board lesson links; I’m impressed. Two readers theaters scripts are listed as well. Pamela shares her biography in a conversational voice. She’s humorous, and I think children will connect with her.

Reading Rockets features an interview with Pamela. I enjoyed viewing the four short 2 minute video clips about how she began writing and her ideas behind the alliteration. She has collaborated with illustrator, Henry Cole, on 18 books. Have fun viewing!

I have posted about her books: Muldoon and The Worrywarts.

Advertisements

Muldoon

April 3, 2010

 Muldoon

Pamela Duncan Edwards brings fun into her texts.  Henry Cole has illustrated the majority of her books, including this one,  Muldoon.  Muldoon is a dog.  He loves his family and does many things for them. 

The story begins with Muldoon being chosen to work for the family.  Pamela narrates the story from Muldoon’s point of view.  The dog is given the personified quality of an employee at a job.  Muldoon has working conditions, supervises the children, and protects the family.  Henry Cole show the family’s point of view through the pictures, which is a contrast to what Muldoon is sharing with his reader.  Cute and very inviting as a read aloud for all ages.

Savorings for reading and in writing for Muldoon:

  • Dog’s point of view – “big blue kennel”, “private apartment”
  • Inferring in the illustrations – the dog is eating the cat food to keep the cat on its diet
  • Personification – the entire text weaves the dog’s viewpoint as a person who has been hired by the family
  • Magic of 3
  • Sequence of events – highlights snapshots of events in the Muldoon’s daily life